The Ultimate Comfort – Like Spruce Point Inn – Lobster Mac’n Cheese

While we totally agree with the beautiful Maine magazine that “Maine is more than just lobsters and lighthouses,” we also can’t help noticing the buzz in our restaurants when any lobster variation arrives from the kitchen. The lore of the lobster bake retains its mystery and the shore dinner in Bogie’s casual bistro is a perennial favorite.

Let Chef Peter Stiles introduce you to a new take on lobster lovers’ decadence: his Lobster Mac’n Cheese on the Ritz.  Seems that mac’n cheese moved from the stuff of childhood to its gourmet heights somewhere in the late 90s. Gourmet Magazine featured a recipe (with just one cheese – classic cheddar) in February 1998. Yet by spring 2006, there was a restaurant in the East Village serving only gourmet mac and cheese. And now gourmet mac’n cheese like Chef Stiles’ has some distinguishing rules. First, you must have more than one cheese – we blend boursin and parmesan in the classic béchamel that is the element that turns the melted cheese into silk (instead of just pizza topping). Second, Chef steams a Maine lobster (straight from the lobstermen’s cooperative, the source for all our lobsters), folding large chunks of lobster meat into the mac ‘n cheese and placing a whole claw on top of his presentation of the dish. And then he crumbles Ritz crackers over the top that browns to the crispy crust gourmet mac ‘n cheese lovers crave. Et voila! Lobster Mac’n Cheese on the Ritz. A classic on our menu in Bogie’s casual bistro.

Lobster Mac'n Cheese

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now that should put you in the mood for the annual Boothbay Harbor Lobster Boat Races, Saturday June 18thfrom 10 am to noon in the outer harbor.